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Some Fine Tuning

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If you have been following the recent media saliva-thon regarding The Obama’s recent trip to China, you may be under the impression that the trip was an utter failure, an abject round of grovelling and slavering, and an unmistakable sign of both Obama’s incompetence and America’s irrevocable decline.  That is the predominant message the US mainstream apparently wishes to get across, with its endless narrative of Obama as a “profligate spender coming to pay respects to his banker”.

Once we in the US agree upon a story, we tend to believe it in the face of contravening evidence (WMDs anyone?).  How else to explain our ignoring of this article in China’s (state-run) China Daily? If one takes its message at face value, this article indicates a major victory for the Obama Administration.

From the article:

The vice-foreign minister said the RMB rate’s flexibility may widen, echoing the nation’s central bank a month ago.

The announcement by Vice-Foreign Minister Zhang Zhijun comes after the People’s Bank of China, which has the power to oversee the yuan and financial institutions, said it was in the process of reforming the exchange rate system.

China is also starting to receive more international pressure to let its currency appreciate. The nation adopted the policy of loosely pegging the RMB to the US dollar since the financial recession began.

“China will increase the flexibility of the RMB exchange rate at a controllable level in the future,” Zhang said, “based on the market demand and with reference to a basket of currencies.”

China Daily is essentially the equivalent of Pravda in the Soviet Union – a state-run publication whose role is to inform the public and businessmen on official government policy (aside from the ‘state-run’ part, not at all dissimilar to our US media). Of course, their articles are written in byzantine journal-ese and one won’t find the slightest breath of dissent within its pages, but over the years it has grown useful in deciphering what the Chinese leadership wishes to say publicly.

Thus the surprise. For more than two years now, China has steadfastly refused to allow its currency to appreciate, an act which nearly every other country considers cheating (or “aggressive monetary policy”). By keeping its currency pegged to the dollar at favorable rates, China puts its export market on steroids. The US has made its position on this practice abundantly clear; our Treasury Secretary castigated China for it literally on his first day, and our leading Nobel Laureates write accusatory op-eds in our state-run newspapers demanding that “something be done”.

Now, a few lines in a China Daily hardly pass for a substantive policy announcement, but one is led to think that Obama and his Chinese doppelganger had a nice little chat while he was over there, and they made some kind of agreement regarding China’s “currency manipulation”.

If China allows its currency to appreciate, they will have acceded to Obama’s central (though unstated) goal in visiting Asia. They will also have begun to do their part in reducing our monstrous and unsustainable trade deficit. However it is also clear that any currency re-valuation on the part of China will spell hardship for America’s “middle class” (that is, the bottom 95%). We depend on cheap products from China to a wholly unhealthy extent, in much the same manner as a heroin user. When inexpensive Chinese currency is no longer an option, import prices are bound to inflate. Of course, this matters little to our policymakers at the top; their interest is in preventing the further hemorrhaging of value from the dollar, thus securing their overseas investments.

So! Good news, I guess?

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Written by pavanvan

November 27, 2009 at 3:20 pm

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